Medication Safety

Unsafe medication practices and medication errors are a leading cause of injury and avoidable harm in health care systems across the world. Errors can occur at different stages of the medication use process. Medication errors occur when weak medication systems and/or human factors such as fatigue, poor environmental conditions or staff shortages affect prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, administration and monitoring practices, which can then result in severe harm, disability and even death – World Health Organisation (2017)

The third WHO Global Patient Safety Challenge: Medication Without Harm was launched in March 2017, and aims to reduce severe avoidable medication-related harm by 50%, globally in the next 5 years.

We provide comprehensive training for those responsible for Medication Safety

  • Understand the concept of Systems Thinking and Models of Safety – looking beyond the individual and the flawed concept of ‘Human Error’
  • Gain an introduction to Human Capabilities & Limitations & how those influence the risk of error care – how humans can be Heroes and Hazards
  • Be able to unpick the nature of human fallibility and why practice does not always make perfect
  • Have the knowledge to proactively contribute to the design of Medication Safety Systems
  • Be able to recognise error-provoking conditions and influence your systems of work
  • Understand the relationship between physiology/fatigue and performance/risk of error
  • Be able to support the development of a more effective Safety Culture

We also provide ongoing support and guidance in developing effective error management systems

Globally, the cost associated with medication errors has been estimated at $42 billion USD annually – World Health Organisation

“Working within medication safety, I was familiar with the term human factors, but my knowledge was limited to topics such as ‘system model of accident causation’ and ‘pattern matching’ as I came across these topics routinely through incident investigation. Attending the human factors course facilitated by MedLed provided me with a further insight into these topics, and completely transformed my knowledge of what exactly the term ‘human factors’ encompasses. My understanding has significantly increased, and this has been applied to my approach of investigating medication related incidents, as well as utilising some of the information learnt to enhance teamwork within the department
Amandeep Setra, Medication Safety Officer, University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Make an Enquiry About This Course, for Your Organisation